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CRECHE  Rating:  Rating
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 Posted: Wed Dec 23rd, 2015 08:42 pm
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Edd
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CRECHE

Screenplay by
Edward Crosby Wells

Based on the play ROAD KILL
by Edward Crosby Wells


© Edward Crosby Wells
All Right Reserved

edd@edwardcrosbywells.net


FADE IN:


ext.--ALBUQUERQUE street scenes leading up to bus station--day--the present


int.--ALBUQUERQUE bus station--day--The present.

JOEY and MARY, a young married couple, pushing a much-used baby carriage.

The carriage is filled with their belongings, including their infant child wrapped in a blanket. Bags of clothes and whatnot hang from the sides of the carriage.

A helium-filled red balloon tied to the carriage rises overhead.

They push their carriage through the terminal and exit.


ext.--street--day

Seedy street.

A homeless shelter where HOMELESS MEN and WOMEN are gathered outside.

Joey and Mary push the carriage along the street past them. Their expressions are sad for the most part.


ext.--street corner in a pleasant neighborhood--day

Joey and Mary are looking down the street both ways.

Joey stands back to display himself for Mary's approval.

joey
Well?

mary
You look wonderful, Joey. Just
wonderful! I know you'll get it.

joey
You think so?

mary
Certainly.

joey
He should be here soon.

MARY
He could have picked a spot where
there's someplace to sit. Are you
sure this is the spot?

JOEY
Absolutely.

MARY
What kind of car does he drive?

JOEY
One that works.

MARY
Funny. Ha, ha, ha.

JOEY
Green.

MARY
What?

JOEY
His car. Green.

MARY
(pointing down the street)
Is that him?

JOEY
(glances at passing car)
No. Besides, that's not green.
That's blue.



MARY
Well, kind of greenish-blue,
wouldn't you say?

JOEY
Yeah, but his is green-green.
Unmistakably green.

MARY
Oh, that kind of green. That's
too green, if you ask me.
(looking down street)
You know what I'd like? I'd like
silver. Can we get a silver car?
I mean, when things get better.

JOEY
When things get better.

MARY
I don't want a green one.

JOEY
(Looking down street)
We'll see.

MARY
I hope you get it, Joey. Maybe,
if you get it and they like you--
of course, they'll like you--they'll
give you overtime. Overtime's good,
Joey. And soon, before you know it,
we'll have ourselves a silver car.
(to baby)
Wouldn't that be nice, sweetheart?
Oh, yes. That would be wonderful.
And mommy and daddy will take you
for nice long rides. Maybe, we'll
take a vacation to Yellowstone.
You'd love that, wouldn't you?

She reaches into the cart and adjusts the blanket before removing a loaf of bread.

She takes out a slice and hands it to Joey who proceeds to eat it.
She takes a slice for herself and puts the loaf back in the cart.

Mary (cont.)
I was thinking the baby and I
would go to the zoo today.

JOEY
They charge.

MARY
Really?

JOEY
Almost certain.

MARY
Isn't it like a public park
or something?


MARY
(adjusts the blanket
on the baby)
I don't want to stay in the bus
station anymore. They're funny
about it.

JOEY
Nobody said anything to me.

MARY
Nobody said anything to me either,
but they look at us funny.

JOEY
I never noticed.

MARY
That's because you're too busy
looking at my ravishingly,
beautiful body. Yeah, right.


ext.--car at stop sign--day

RUDE MAN yells out the window of the car.

RUDE MAN
Get the fuck off the street!
There's enough trash around
here without you littering up
the neighborhood! Get a job!

The car and the RUDE MAN speed away.


ext.--back to joey and mary--day

MARY
(yells at car)
You got one for us!?

JOEY
Let it go.

MARY
Why?

Joey embraces Mary. He comforts her.

MARY (CONT.)
Why?

JOEY
I don't know why. Some people
are that way, that's all.

MARY
(turns to baby)
The baby . . .

JOEY
Let it go.

MARY
I don't know why people hate us.

JOEY
They're unhappy.


MARY
(after looking in on
the baby)
I don't like to be looked at funny.
(to baby)
Do we, sweetie?
(back to Joey)
We took a nice long walk when you
went to the unemployment office.
Saw some awful pretty houses, Joey.
Even saw the street where I want us
to live.

JOEY
(distracted)
That’s nice.

MARY
Are you sure this is where you're
supposed to meet him?

JOEY
Yes, Mary. I'm sure.

MARY
Well, where is he? Maybe he was
a phony. Maybe he was just saying
he'd take you to see his boss and
didn’t mean it at all. Maybe he
was making it all up.

JOEY
Why would somebody do a thing like
that, huh?

MARY
Same reason that guy in the car said
what he said. Maybe he was unhappy, too.
(seeing something across
the street)

Ext.--across the street--day

CAN COLLECTOR walks along the sidewalk carrying a large plastic bag filled with aluminum cans.


EXT.--BACK TO JOEY AND MARY--DAY

There is sadness in Mary's face.

Suddenly, she has an idea.

MARY
(to Joey)
I need some of those big plastic
garbage bags. If you run across
any today I need them.

JOEY
'Kay.

MARY
I'm going to start collecting
aluminum cans. Dot and John got
a regular business going. There's
good money in aluminum cans.


JOEY
Who's that?

MARY
I met in the park over by the library.
They live in their van, only it doesn't
run. John's working on it though. Dot says he’s a mechanic. There's big money
in being a mechanic, isn't there?

JOEY
(looking down the street,
distracted)
I suppose.

MARY
Sure there is.
(looks down the street)
Wouldn't a van be nice, Joey? We
could take all kinds of trips then,
huh?


JOEY
(distracted)
Uh-huh. That would be nice, Mary.
(disappointed)
Maybe . . . No. He’ll come. He'll
be here.

MARY
Sure. He'll be here.
(to baby)
Won't he sweetheart? He'll be
here with bells on. Then, daddy's
gonna get a job. Maybe he’ll have
his own office. Then, we could visit
daddy in his office. Or a cubicle.
I hope it’s not a cubicle. An office.
A real office. Wouldn’t that be nice?
(to Joey)
He's been sleeping an awful lot
lately.

JOEY
That's what babies do.

MARY
But he never cries. Babies are
supposed to cry.

JOEY
Naah. He's a prince. Princes
don't cry.

MARY
I hope you're right.
(to baby)
I sure hope your daddy's right.
(to Joey)
Did he say what kind of job it was?
joey
Keeping count of things. Electronic
stuff, I think.

MARY
Ohh . . . there's big money in that.
(to baby)
Daddy's gonna make big money. Isn't
that nice? Big money.
(to Joey)
Are you sure he said today?

JOEY
Eight o'clock.

MARY
Then he's not on time.

JOEY
Maybe he's running late.

MARY
(looking down the
street)
There he is!


ext.--approaching car--DAY

A car slows to stop at stop sign across the street.

WOMAN IN CAR waves dollar bill and signals for Joey or Mary to come over and take her handout.

MARY
No, thank you. We don’t take handouts.

WOMAN IN CAR withdraws her money and stares back with contempt.

Car continues on its way.


EXT.--BACK TO JOEY AND MARY--DAY

Joey and Mary watch the car as it moves away.
They each look at the other, and say nothing.

MARY (CONT.)
I guess that wasn't him.
(she has an idea)
Pass gas.


JOEY
What?

MARY
Pass gas. You know . . . toot, toot.

JOEY
I don’t have to.

MARY
Try.

JOEY
I can’t.

MARY
Too bad. If you did he'd come.
You can hold it and hold it and
the minute you let it out--bingo!
Somebody appears. It's one of those
laws--Murphy's Law, maybe.

JOEY
Mary, maybe we should find someplace
to keep the baby. Until we get
ourselves--situated. Not for long.
A few weeks maybe.

MARY
Keep the baby! What do you mean,
“keep the baby!?”

JOEY
Just till we’re situated.

MARY
We are situated. We got each other.
You'll get that job and everything
will be just fine. You’ll see. Middle
class

JOEY
Suppose . . .

MARY
Suppose, suppose, suppose! I don't suppose.
JOEY
But things haven't been . . .

MARY
They will.

JOEY
Until they do . . .

MARY
(covering her ears)
I don't want to hear it!
(to baby)
He makes me so mad. You won't
ever be negative, will you? Our
little prince will be so positive.
Yes you will. And maybe one day
you'll be President of the United
States of America.
(to Joey)
Wouldn't that be nice? Or a doctor.
More money in being a doctor.

JOEY
He could be both.

MARY
Yeah. A doctor first and then the
President.

JOEY
Now don't go pushing him. He
might want to be something else.

MARY
Like what?

JOEY
I don't know. A mechanic, maybe.

MARY
Of all the things in this world
to be, why on Earth would our son
want to be a mechanic? Yuck.


JOEY
Maybe he won't, but maybe he won't
want to be a doctor--or the President,
either.

MARY
Who wouldn't want to be the President?
You mean to tell me you wouldn't want
to rule the world?

JOEY
The President doesn't rule the world.

MARY
He does ours.

JOEY
Running the country and ruling the
world are two different things.

MARY
S'pose. Who's in charge anyway?

JOEY
We. The people. Us.

MARY
Then why aren't we doing a
better job?

JOEY
Maybe we don't know how.

MARY
Here we are--we, the people--
running the best country on Earth
and we don't know how we do it.
(looking up and down
the street, to Joey)
Joey, maybe he meant eight o'clock
tonight.

JOEY
Nope. In the morning.


MARY
Maybe this wasn't the morning he meant.

JOEY
Nope. This is the morning he meant.

In silence, they both look up and down the street.

JOEY (Cont.)
Are you sure I look all right?

MARY
You look wonderful.

JOEY
It's important to make a good
first impression.

MARY
That's what they say. I was thinking.
I mean, when things get better. You
know, when we get a place. A real
place. Not like the bus station. Do
you think I could get a job?

JOEY
You know how I feel about my wife
working.

MARY
I know, but it would be like insurance. Insurance against this happening again.
(to baby)
I guess we didn't manage things right,
did we, sweetie? I'm not complaining.
What's done is done. Things could be
worse.
(to Joey)
Hate.

JOEY
What about it?

MARY
‘Bout what?

JOEY
Hate.

MARY
Don’t you feel it? People are not
nice anymore. They only care about
themselves. Well, I hate them, too!

JOEY
‘Kay.

MARY
I don't like the way they look at me.
Funny, you know?

JOEY
Nobody looks at you funny.

MARY
They do and you know it. They’re
always looking funny.

JOEY
(makes a fist)
Next time I'll have a word with
them.

MARY
(to the baby)
Listen to your daddy talk . . .
he'll have a 'talk' with them. Ha!
(noticing something in
the gutter)
Oh, no. No, no, no . . .

JOEY
What? What is it?

MARY
Look.


Ext:--the gutter--day

There is a dead cat in the gutter.


EXT.--BACK TO JOEY AND MARY--DAY

Mary moves in closer to the dead animal. Joey approaches Mary, puts his hands on her shoulders and turns her to face him.

A carload of RAUCOUS DRUNKS comes to a quick stop in front of them.

One scary-looking DRUNK comes out of the car.

DRUNK
Hey, bitches! Watcha doin’ in the gutter.

MARY
Showing respect to one of God’s creatures.

DRUNK
(loudly to the guys
in car)
The bitch is showin’ respect to a dead
cat! Sumpin’ stinks.

JOEY
Look, we don’t want any trouble--

DRUNK
Was I talkin’ to you?

JOEY
No.

DRUNK
Then shut the fuck up!

For the first time we see that the DRUNK is holding a
crowbar. The men in the car laugh and cheer the Drunk on.

DRUNK
(To Mary)
Whatcha got in the carriage, bitch?

MARY
My son.

JOEY
Our son.

DRUNK
(to Joey)
I told you to shut the fuck up, didn’t I?

MAN IN CAR
(yells out window)
Ask him if he wants to fight.

DRUNK
You heard the man. So, do ya?

JOEY
No. Please. I’m starting a new job today.

MARY
(chiming in)
Joey will be working with electronics. Tell him, Joey.

DRUNK
(to Mary--by the carriage)
Yo, bitch!

The DRUNK walks slowly to the carriage while toying with the crowbar.

DRUNK (CON’T)
Ya gonna show me what’s in the basket?

MARY
I told you--my son.

The DRUNK bends over to look in the carriage. The DRUNK goes pale and in shock. He runs to the car.

DRUNK
(to his buddies)
Let me in! Goddamit!

His BUDDIES have locked the car. They are laughing wildly.


DRUNK (CON’T)
Open this fucking door!

He raises the crowbar and slams it on the roof of the car. They open the door.

BUDDY
What the fuck--

DRUNK pushes him in and the car races away.


JOEY
(to Mary)
Are you alright.

MARY
Yes.

JOEY
Me, too. It’s a new world out there.

MARY
Not a good one.

JOEY
No. Not a good one. Come on. It’s
dead. Rotting. Come on. Get away
from it.

MARY
Somebody should bury it.

JOEY
It's in the street, Mary, There's
no place to bury it. Besides, it's
half eaten and decayed already. In
another week there won't be a trace
of it left.

MARY
It's not right to just leave it
there.

Joey pulls her back to the carriage.

JOEY
Come on. That thing carries all
kinds of diseases. Think of the baby.

Mary rummages through one of the bags hanging over the side of the carriage and comes up with a red bandana.

JOEY (CONT.)
Hey. What are you going to do with
that?

MARY
Cover it.

JOEY
Not with my good bandana you're not.


MARY
If it's not going to get buried, it
needs to be covered. That animal
needs it more than you do.

JOEY
It's dead, Mary.

MARY
I know. I know. But that’s no reason
to leave it like that.

Mary approaches the dead animal and covers it with the red bandana.

MARY (CONT.)
There. Nobody deserves to be left
out in the open--even if they are dead.


JOEY
(reluctantly)
Yeah . . . sure. Even if they are dead.

MARY
I found this beautiful street yesterday
lined with trees and--


Ext.--beautiful house on beautiful street--day

There is a WOMAN IN WINDOW holding a baby. Looking out the window of her house. She’s playing some sort of smiling game with the baby.

MARY (O.S.)
--grass as green as green gets.
Greener than that man's car, I bet.
There was this woman in the window of
her beautiful house. And, she looked at us looking at her and she grabbed her baby--

JOEY (O.S.)
She had a baby?

MARY (O.S.)
She grabbed her baby, held it close
to her, then gave us a look.


EXT.--BACK TO JOEY AND MARY ON THE SIDEWALK--DAY

MARY
I'll never forget it. Never. I
saw myself, Joey. Looking out as I
was looking in, I saw myself in her
eyes. It frightened me.

Joey embraces Mary.

JOEY
Shhh. She wasn't looking at you.
She was looking at a stranger on the
street. Not you. If she was looking
at you, Mary--really looking at you--
she'd have come to the door and invited
you in.

Joey kisses Mary.

MARY
(after the kiss)
What were you thinking of?

JOEY
When?

MARY
Now. Just now. When you kissed me.

JOEY
I was thinking . . . well, I was
thinking of you.

MARY
No, you weren't. Your eyes looked
off to the side.

JOEY
Not true.

MARY
True. You avoided me.

JOEY
I just wish to God he'd hurry up
and come, that's all.

MARY
He will. I can feel it.
(to baby)
Good things come to those who wait.
Don't they, sweetheart?

JOEY
There was a man. One of those
people who were forced off the
church property. His wife's in the
city jail. Got picked up for shoplifting.
So he celebrated--

MARY
Celebrated?

JOEY
Sure. She was in a warm place with
three meals a day. He got stinking,
dead drunk. This was the day before

(MORE)
JOEY (CON’T)
yesterday. That night--the night
before last when that storm hit us--
dead drunk, he crawled into a dumpster
and passed out. Yesterday morning the
truck came to get the garbage--

Mary picks up the baby and clutches it tightly.

JOEY (CONT.)
And they hooked the dumpster to the
truck, lifted it and dumped it into the
truck. Then they turned on the switch to compress the garbage--

MARY
Oh, God.

JOEY
They heard a squeal--like a sheep.

MARY
Is he dead?

JOEY
No. But he lost his legs.

MARY
Poor man.

JOEY
Yes. Poor man.
(beat)
There he is! Across the street!


EXT.--ACROSS THE STREET--DAY

We see JOEY’S RIDE in his car.

On the side of the door a sign reads, “WE KILL ANYTHING THAT CRAWLS.”

JOEY’S RIDE
Joe! We're late!


EXT.--BACK TO JOEY AND MARY--DAY

Mary carefully places the baby back into the carriage.

MARY
Oh, hurry, Joey. Don't keep the
man waiting!

Joey gives Mary a quick embrace. Kisses her. Leans into the carriage and kisses the baby.

JOEY
(to Mary)
You sure I look okay?

MARY
You look magnificent, Joey.

JOEY’S RIDE (O.S.)
C’mon, Joe! Let’s go!

JOEY
(to the man)
Be right there.
(to Mary)
Wish me luck. Where will you be?

Joey moves out of frame.

MARY
(calling to him)
Look for the red balloon!

SOUND of car door slamming and car taking off.

MARY (CONT.)
(towards car)
Luck.
(to the baby)
What are we gonna do today, huh?
What does mommy's little prince
want to do? We don’t want anymore
nasty men We could go to the park--

Mary begins to push the carriage away from us so that we see her back.

MARY (CONT.)
--collect aluminum cans, look at all
the pretty houses. Would you like
that? There's all kinds of things we
could do.

Mary and the carriage continue to retreat.

MARY (CONT.)
Maybe today somebody will invite us
in for tea and cookies. One never knows. Wouldn't that be nice? It's possible.
In these United States of America anything
is possible. Isn't it, sweetheart?
(smirking)
Yeah, right . . .


camera slowly moves TOWARDS THE CARRIAGE AND LOOKS IN TO SEE THE REMAINS OF AN INFANT. IT IS HORRIFYING. Rotting flesh AND EXPOSED BONES ARE covered with maggots.

FREEZE FRAME

end credits.

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