View single post by J Brian Long
 Posted: Wed Apr 11th, 2007 10:49 pm
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J Brian Long

 

Joined: Tue Jan 30th, 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 77
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Mana: 
in media res,

I am glad you were able to find something of use in my commentary on your

poem.

 

I think it is wonderful that you also enjoy Sandburg. I admit that I have experienced

very little of his prose, but am proud to say that I have read every published poem he

has ever written. I have been to visit his home, Connemara (now a national historic site),

and have stood in the very room where he died. When the guide wasn't looking, I reached

out and touched the rim of his hat hanging on a hall tree (that particular experience ended

up inspiring a poem which made it into my book.) While I was there, I purchased a collection

of readings he had recorded, and I listened to it on the return drive. I have to tell you, they

were God-awful. There was this one poem (I think it was Four Preludes On Playthings Of The

Wind), in which he attempted to sound like a crow ("Caw! Caw!")... I realize he must have

intended it to be taken seriously, but the thing just ended up making me laugh until I actually

cried. I rewound that one a few times just to hear him and to start myself laughing all over

again (and I know that probably makes me a bit of a bastard, but, alas, there are some things

we cannot help, it seems).


"Grass" is a good poem, I agree. My personal favorite anti-war poem of his is

"Crimson Changes People"

 

This:

"While I am a lover of poetry and a reader and performer of poetry..."

is very interesting to me. I wonder if I might send something to you that I have sought

to have critiqued from someone who is involved in the performance of poetry. I once knew

a person from whom I could rely on for such indulgences, but we have lost track of one

another over time (he was far more intelligent than I, and I think it was that I simply

couldn't keep pace; there is only so much patience to be given sometimes with someone

who you think will never truly grasp whatever concept it is you are attempting to discuss;

I bored the poor man to the death of our correspondence, I believe, and I have not

heard from him in a long while. Pathetic, I know, but, as mentioned before, there are,

alas, some things we cannot help.)

 

May I send the poem to you (via PM), so that you might tear it to pieces for me?

 

--J Brian Long

 

Last edited on Thu Apr 12th, 2007 11:17 am by J Brian Long