The Playwrights Forum Home 
  STAGEPLAYS BOOKSHOP NEW CYBERPRESS PLAYS PLAYWRIGHTING BOOKS PUBLISH MY PLAY AFFILIATE PROGRAM  
The Playwrights Forum > Welcome > +++ STOP PRESS +++ > Sad news about Paul Thain

* STAGEPLAYS WANTS TO PUBLISH YOUR PLAY *
click here for details

 Moderated by: Paddy, Edd
New Topic Reply Printer Friendly
Sad news about Paul Thain  Rate Topic 
AuthorPost
 Posted: Fri Jul 8th, 2022 06:59 am
  PM Quote Reply
1st Post
Paddy
Moderator


Joined: Fri Jun 9th, 2006
Location: Kitchener, Ontario Canada
Posts: 2939
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 
Hello -

It's Paul Thain's wife, Jane here. Paddy is posting this on our behalf.

I'm very sad to tell you that Paul died on January 8th following a short but brutal journey with lung cancer.

He passed surrounded by myself and his children. We miss him everyday.

Paul had a lifelong passion with the Arts and had a huge affection for both this community, and the support you provide each other every day. We plan on this forum to continue under Paddy's great leadership and Stageplays.com will also continue as is.

I've pasted his Eulogy below if you'd like to take a look. It was delivered by our son, Dan.

Here's the Eulogy ----

Born to Vi and George, in South Shields, Tyne and Wear on the 6th of September, 1949 Paul Thain, was loved by, and loved his parents deeply.

A bright and challenging little boy with a curious and entrepreneurial spirit, Dad drove Gran, as we knew her, to distraction with his projects to build radios, whittle guitars and by starting window washing businesses.

He was five years old when his little sister Carol arrived.

She became his most devoted fan in all his crazy exploits, following him everywhere from the time she could toddle.

They were a working class Geordie family with nothing for luxuries.

But Dad spoke fondly of his childhood.

Particularly early morning on Christmas Day when he and Carol would be welcomed by a banked-up glowing orange fire… in a living room full of presents bought at the Christmas Eve toy auction.

But Dad was born out of sync with that world. He had a thirst for knowledge and a thirst for more. Because Dad was born a little bit different.

He marched to the beat of his own drum. And he was blessed with an intellect and talent that could be spotted from a mile away.

Aged four he stunned his Aunts with his intricate knowledge about how the universe was formed and constructed.

He seemingly didn't need to learn, he just understood.

He cruised through the 11+ and entered the South Shields Boys Grammar School, where they found Dad thoughtful, talented and, quite obviously, difficult to control.

As a teen, Dad seized the opportunity to join the National Youth Theater and the company's founder and artistic Director Michael Croft spotted his unique talent.

So - watched by his proud family - he took lead roles such as Zigger Zagger, Macduff and Lysander.

Dad revelled in the chance to take Carol and Gran backstage to meet the cast and crew. And excited by the new opportunities to travel to London.
Dad had always written - even as a child - scripting, acting and directing his plays with Carol his co-star.

But the National Youth Theater catalyzed his passion for the arts.
So he gave up life as a bus conductor, studied A levels and applied to read Drama and Theater Arts at Birmingham University.

In typical fashion, his car broke down on his way to the interview.

He turned up hours late - covered in grease and oil.

And in typical fashion, the interview panel were so impressed with him, he walked out of that room with not only a place on the course, but a full grant too.

This son of a miner and a cleaner had become the first member of our family to go to university.

And it's Birmingham where my Mum and Dad met.

He came to borrow books from Guy, Mum's flatmate at the time. And my parents fell in love at first sight. Dad got the books and the girl.

And it's lucky that the whole love at first sight thing happened.

Because Dad’s future mother-in-law Granny Val was very much a third wheel on their very first date.

And I think it’s fair to say that Granny Val was slightly discombobulated by the Mick Jagger-esque Northerner, trying to woo her only daughter. Mum and Dad soon married and began to build their lives together.

Not everyone was delighted by their union. Mum overheard some distant relatives taking bets on if their marriage would last just weeks or months at their wedding reception.

Two children. Two grandchildren. And 17,921 days later, I think it's fair to say they proved the skeptics and cynics wrong.

After Birmingham, Mum and Dad found their way to London where Dad took a job - without any training - as an English teacher at Quinton Kiniston School.

I think it's likely that Dad was the least prepared, yet most loved, member of staff. But again, my Dad wanted more.

Teaching gave him the chance - during the long summer school holidays, to concentrate on developing his writing.

With the birth of my sister Miranda, he saw the opportunity to BOTH become her full time carer, but also to pursue his passion as a playwright. But he needed an Agent.

And when BBC Radio 4 began expressing interest in his work, he, of course, approached the best playwright’s agent in London, the legendary Peggy Ramsay. And Peggy took Dad on.

Sometime before this though Mum and Dad had met - through their dear friend Tony - a kind, gentle American, called Tom Erhardt.

Through a shared love of Bridge and a shared love of life, Tom quickly became a central part of our family - and of Dad’s personal and professional life.

For Tom was not only my sister's Godfather, but assistant to Peggy Ramsay too. It was Tom who suggested that Dad might assist the film director, Jack Clayton, in the development of a screenplay based on Shirley Jackson’s novel We Have Always Lived In The Castle. The film was never made but Jack and Dad became good friends.

Living in Notting Hill, as Dad would say ‘when poor people could afford to live there’ Mum and Dad had become firm friends with Ian and Nick, the couple in the flat upstairs who -over much wine, many good meals and much debating, all decided to make a move to the country.

And it was that move to Norfolk and the Old Rectory in 1981 that proved Dad's desire for more.

It was his true happy place. And the place I first entered just 18 hours old. The Old Rectory, with Mum and Dad at its heart, gave us a beautiful childhood.

Laughter & fun - in an incredible home.

A place where we were always encouraged to imagine and adventure.
Surrounded by love. Surrounded by interesting people. Surrounded by ideas Surrounded by debate about life, politics and art.

The Old Rectory became a home to BOTH those of us who lived there and for many who just visited.

And the epitome of the Rectory was New Years Eve and the people involved.

Because Mum and Dad built a family beyond blood - Ian, Tom, Ruth, Guy, David, Tony, Stephen, Barbara, Ian, Helena, Nigel, Lee, Paul, Vicky, Pauline, Fitz and many more.

For decades we gathered to welcome in the year to come.

With extraordinary amounts of extraordinary food, washed down with extraordinary amounts of pretty average wine.

We sang around the piano. We first footed. We dressed up and played endless games of murder, charades and Trivial Pursuit.

We looked forward to hearing my Dad’s yearly reminder to Stephen about just how old Mr Scully would be in the year to come.

This home was open to all.

That welcoming place of ideas, which Dad occupied for more than 30 years, enabled him to see further and deeper into the world.

He perfected his innate ability to see what could be rather than what was. And this talent defined both his professional and personal life.

To highlight the oppression of the working class during the Thatcher years, my Dad created and wrote The Biggest Sandcastle in the World.

A play - which won the BBC Radio Giles Cooper Best Play Award - and creatively and artfully brought to life the struggles that a forgotten people felt.

When in the Gambia on holiday, Dad ignored the warnings of the holiday reps, walked past the armed guards, and with Seiko - a local man he’d just met, but whose character shone through - entered the shanty towns at night to see how Gambians really lived. He learned their plight - and wrote a play, Monkey Dance Honeymoon, to highlight the corruption, abuse and inequity of their lives.

And being a father also inspired Dad’s work.

He and Miranda wrote their first play together, Papa Panov’s Magic Christmas, for her primary school nativity.

And he later wrote a second play for children, Stone Soup, an allegory which explores poverty and justice

He turned his life, into his art.
And his art, into his life.

And when much of the world thought the Internet was a fad, in 1997, he started Stageplays.com which has been serving the theater community for 25 years. And continues strongly today.

In 2015, the Rectory days came to an end and Mum and Dad embarked on a new life in York - a city they had fallen in love with when visiting Miranda at University.

The move north enabled them to be more involved with their first grandson, Rafe, and for Dad to realise his dream of building a room with a huge cinema screen, to watch the movies he loved.

And during those years, Dad became more than my father. He became my friend.

We have shared so many happy memories in New York, Old York, DC and around the world.

And I knew that there would be no better person to marry me and Hil. And I was right.

In that ceremony, Dad talked about how he was so happy that his golden boy had met his little miss sunshine. He spoke with such eloquence and joy. And I was so proud to have him by my side as I married the woman I love.

And I saw that same joy as he played with his two grandchildren Rafe and Charlie Ray - right until the end.

He was the first person I'd turn to when I needed help or support. And I very much hope to share a similar relationship with my son Charlie as he grows.

Guided by his fierce intellect, generosity and curiosity, my Dad lived his life on his own terms and in his own way.

He welcomed everyone and anyone with open arms.

He used every interaction he had with family or strangers alike - to both teach and to learn.

And he had a presence that could be felt from the first moment he walked into a room, through to the last moment he left it.

But he will always be here. Because I believe, that when you share truly happy experiences with a person, while the physical part may leave, the love breaks off from one and stays in the other.

So I must admit the part of him who stays with me today will deeply miss the part of him who departs from us.

I leave you with two thoughts that I think Dad would approve of:

First, Fuck cancer.

And second, be curious about the world in the way he was.

Because Paul Thain was driven by a thirst for more.
By love.
By generosity.
And by kindness.

As an actor, performer and writer - I can think of no more fitting tribute than a final, standing ovation for Paul Thain.
So please now stand and clap for my Dad.

We miss you.
We love you.
Sleep well, lovely, kind man.

Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Fri Jul 8th, 2022 07:13 am
  PM Quote Reply
2nd Post
Paddy
Moderator


Joined: Fri Jun 9th, 2006
Location: Kitchener, Ontario Canada
Posts: 2939
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 
I feel so sad, and a bit empty for not knowing him better. Of course, again, I am sorry for your loss, but more than this - I am so happy for the time you spent with this amazing man, how as a husband, father and friend, he loved.

I'm thinking of him often. Especially this week, when we lost the most passionate, kind and talented theatre creator in our region. And that when someone like him, or Paul exits, there is a space left empty - s space where they used to be, yet, as artists, their legacy is not only in what art they created, but what art they inspired.

Love to all of you. Tell Dan his eulogy was beautiful.

Paddy

Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: Fri Jul 8th, 2022 07:13 am
  PM Quote Reply
3rd Post
Paddy
Moderator


Joined: Fri Jun 9th, 2006
Location: Kitchener, Ontario Canada
Posts: 2939
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 
I feel so sad, and a bit empty for not knowing him better. Of course, again, I am sorry for your loss, but more than this - I am so happy for the time you spent with this amazing man, how as a husband, father and friend, he loved.

I'm thinking of him often. Especially this week, when we lost the most passionate, kind and talented theatre creator in our region. And that when someone like him, or Paul exits, there is a space left empty - s space where they used to be, yet, as artists, their legacy is not only in what art they created, but what art they inspired.

Love to all of you. Tell Dan his eulogy was beautiful.

Paddy

Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Tue Jul 12th, 2022 12:09 pm
  PM Quote Reply
4th Post
Potabasil
Member


Joined: Thu Jan 24th, 2008
Location: Peyton Place, New Hampshire USA
Posts: 861
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 
I popped in today to maybe write something to critique my poem thread. Paddy your post caught my eye and I must say I'm very sad to hear this news about Paul. When the pandemic was running riot around the world and I would post some bits and pieces Paul every time commented on my post. I really appreciated his doing so, everyone I posted he would give me a bit of encouragement to write another. Please send my deepest condolence to his family. Rest in Peace, Paul, you will be missed on Stageplays Forum

Last edited on Fri Jul 15th, 2022 05:31 pm by Potabasil

Back To Top PM Quote Reply

Current time is 04:09 am  
The Playwrights Forum > Welcome > +++ STOP PRESS +++ > Sad news about Paul Thain Top




UltraBB 1.17 Copyright © 2007-2011 Data 1 Systems
Page processed in 0.1412 seconds (12% database + 88% PHP). 25 queries executed.